New to Busy?

Doctors, Dietitians, and Other Professionals Know Very Little.

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edicted
71
7 months agoBusy5 min read

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I feel a charge in the air.

Change is on the horizon.

Something in me snapped about a month ago. I was tired of grinding out life sitting atop this mesh throne; trying to ignore my shoulder pain and crank out a product for Steem.

As someone who only works 20 hours a week, I find myself with a lot of free time. However, most of that free time gets burned by the incessant mind numbing physiological and physical pain I experience on a daily basis. It usually isn't much, but it's just enough to drastically lower my productivity.

So I started a new diet.

At first, the diet was simple: only eat when you are hungry. Stop eating when you aren't hungry anymore. Unit bias can play a lot of tricks on the mind. As someone who values efficiency and frugality, it's very hard to just leave a few bites of food on my plate when I could just as well eat it.

However, I've noticed that over the years I've lost pretty much all of my self-control and discipline. Where did it all go? I had so much at one point. Sapped away by a lifetime of depression fed by living in scarcity, no doubt. Watching as our amazing society makes incredible technological advances while the working man continues to slave away for less money after every year that ticks by.

In any case, I had such a visible benefit to changing my diet in such a short amount of time that I decided to take it even more seriously. I continue to cut out as much processed food from my intake as possible, in addition to adding more vegetables and lean meats.

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Get to the point.

I've done a lot of research over the last month about diet, exercise, and most importantly: physical therapy for my shoulder injury. The one constant in all my research (not just limited to those topics) is that even experts on the topic get it wrong all the time.

When I started watching YouTube videos targeting the subject, I essentially learned that everything I was being told about my injury and how to fix it 10 years ago was wrong (or at least partially so). Now the exercises I've been doing have stopped my injury from sounding like a nutcracker every time I try to work on it. I've made a lot of progress but I might not even be to the halfway point yet. Only time will tell.

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More misinformation

Well! With a name like Miss Information she must know something!


How many of us have heard that you have to cut 3500 calories to lose a pound of fat?

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Yeah well, that's not true, not by a long shot. And by no means do I agree with the article I just linked that "proves" this. There are so many variables at play and the 'experts' try to narrow it down to a single attribute.

I've lost 30 pounds in 5 weeks. If we were to go by the whole 3500 calories rule that's a 105,000 calorie deficit in 35 days. That's a 3000 calorie deficit a day. I've almost lost a whole pound every single day of the month. Show those numbers to a doctor and they're going to be like:

Holy shit that is really unhealthy, you need to calm the F down.

This is false. It's literally all untrue. First of all, we don't know how much of that weight was fat. It could have been water. I also could have lost a little muscle (although I doubt it because of the exercise involved).

For the vast majority of my life my normal weight was 180-200, so it makes sense that it would be insanely easy for me to drop 30 pounds off of a frame that was never meant to support it in the first place. Now that I'm back to 200, things will probably calm down a bit. We'll see.

In addition, I can guarantee that my body had some insane hormone imbalances. The drastic changes I've made to my diet and exercise regimen clearly had my testosterone levels (and who knows what else) bouncing all over the place.

It's actually pretty weird how in tune I am with my body these days. I know when I'm losing weight. I know when I'm gaining weight. When I feel fatigued it's because I didn't eat enough protein. When I have cravings to eat right after eating I know that my body wants fat.

The point is that there are certain things about your existence that you are the expert on. No one can know these things better than you. We should start listening to ourselves more often rather than try to parse the opinions of the 'experts'. To be fair, one needs a wide variety of knowledge before they can establish a solid baseline for such things.

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This applies to everything.

Misinformation is everywhere. We should constantly be reminding ourselves that there is financial incentive to keep the world in the dark ages. However, those days are slowly coming to an end. These top heavy power structures that control everything are about to implode, and I hope that we all can ride that tidal wave of destruction and rebirth without wiping out in the waters of debt and wage slavery.

Stay Frosty

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